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1965 Ferrari 275 GTB

Chassis Number: 6645

The Ferrari 275 family was borne out of the 250 GT series, which drew to a close in 1963, with the team at Maranello believing that they could successfully develop it no further. One thing, however, was clear, and that was that Ferrari wished to continue its highly successful and lucrative formula of dual-purpose sports racing cars.

Enter stage left the 275. Unveiled at the 1964 Paris Auto Show, the 275 GT Berlinetta was very much a 250 GT on steroids; Pininfarina had created an even more honed and aggressive looking version of its elder sibling. From a technical perspective, it was the first road-going Ferrari to be equipped with a transaxle and independent rear suspension. These features, coupled with the relocation of the engine towards the bulkhead, succeeded in improving handling and road manners. 6645 is one of the first 275 GTBs to be produced and, as such, has the hauntingly beautiful short nose. This variant was available for just two years in 1964 and 1965, when the Scuderia introduced a longer redesigned nose, intended to assist with the aerodynamics so important for track work. This was no doubt great news for the racing fraternity but the car didn’t look anywhere near as good.

6645 was sold through Luigi Chinetti Motors, the New York-based Ferrari dealer, to its first owner, Dr. Harry F Jones. Jones went on to race a Daytona Ferrari at Le Mans in 1974 and ‘75, so clearly enjoyed the Italian marque. It is believed that Jones travelled to Italy and collected 6645 in Maranello, enjoying it in its homeland for a few months. Indeed, the first two services were carried out in Italy by SEFAC automobile Ferrari Modena prior to the car’s return to the US in the later part of 1965.

6645 boasts a fully documented US history. In the 1990s it received its first major restoration with a full engine rebuild by the late Wayne Obry’s Motion Products with work to the suspension, transaxle, steering box and other key components by well-known Pebble Beach restorer, Patrick Otis. In recent time, the Ferrari has been looked after by GTO Engineering in the UK and has been chosen as the safety car at the Goodwood Revival meeting on several occasions.

Offered complete with identification documents and a thick file of invoices, including three from Chinetti Motors between 1965 and 1968, this left-hand drive, triple carb example presents a compelling opportunity to own a short nose 275 GTB. The short nose is very much the connoisseurs’ choice and as one of Ferrari’s Grand Touring cars, it is equally at home on the racetrack as the switchback roads of the Mediterranean.

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